GENDER PAY GAP 2018

DURHAM CONSTABULARY

GENDER PAY GAP 2018

 

We are an employer required by law to carry out Gender Pay Reporting under the Equality Act 2010 (Gender pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017.

 

This involves carrying out 6 calculations which show the difference between the average earnings of men and women in the Force: it does not involve publishing individual employees data.  We are required to publish this data on both the Force’s website and also a Government website on an annual basis.  The purpose of this data is to assess:

 

·       The levels of gender quality in our workplace.

·       The balance of male and female employees at different levels

·       How effectively talent is being maximised and rewarded.

 

The challenge in our Force will be to eliminate any gender pay gap.

 

We employ approximately 2,250 officers and staff. 

 

We are required to calculate and publish the following:

 

·       Mean gender pay gap.

·       Median gender pay gap

·       Mean bonus gender pay gap

·       Median bonus gender pay gap.

·       Proportion of males and females receiving a bonus.

·       Proportion of males and females in each quartile band.

 

Full definitions of the above can be found within the Acas guidance within the following link www.acas.org.uk/genderpay.

 

Gender Pay Gap 31st March 2017

 

The overall workforce is split by gender as follows:

 

Gender

Employees

Percentage Split

Male

1,235

55%

Female

1,015

45%

Total

2,250

100%

 

Mean and Median Pay Gap

 

·       Mean (average) pay gap is 14.77%

·       Median pay gap is 26.96%

 

 

Published Average and Median for Officers and Staff

 

Published

Male

Female

Gap

Percentage

Average hourly rate

17.06

14.54

£2.52

14.77%

Median

18.21

13.30

£4.91

26.96%

 

This shows the combined pay gap for both officers and staff.  Given the relative workforce mix and differing salary levels between officers and staff, the above table needs to be interpreted with caution.

 

Officers Average and Median

 

Published

Male

Female

Gap

Percentage

Average hourly rate

18.73

18.37

£0.36

1.90%

Median

18.63

18.33

£0.30

1.61%

 

 

% of Employees in each Quartile:

Quartile

Female

Male

Grand Total

Lower

33.33%

66.67%

100%

Lower Middle

35.74%

64.26%

100%

Upper Middle

24.05%

75.95%

100%

Upper

23.45%

76.55%

100%

Total

29.15%

70.85%

100%

 

The above tables reflect the position that male and female officers are paid the same salaries at each rank. The difference arises from the fact that there are fewer women in senior ranks than men, although this has improved in recent years.

 

Staff Average and Median

 

Published

Male

Female

Gap

Percentage

Average hourly rate

13.72

12.62

£1.10

8.01%

Median

12.44

12.17

£0.27

2.17%


 

% of Employees in each Quartile:

Quartile

Female

Male

Grand Total

Lower

73%

27%

100%

Lower Middle

60%

40%

100%

Upper Middle

61%

39%

100%

Upper

55%

45%

100%

Total

62%

38%

100%

 

The above table shows a pay gap which reflects the position that there are more males in senior positions than females. In particular, it also shows that there are significantly more females in the lowest quartile pay band compared to males.

 

 

Total Employees – Salary Quartile Bands

 

Total Employees

Low

Mid-low

Mid-high

High

Male

210

263

341

421

Female

352

300

222

141

Male Proportion

33.37%

46.71%

60.56%

74.91%

Female Proportion

62.63%

53.29%

39.43%

25.09%

 

Bonus Payments

 

Nil bonus payments made.

 

Conclusion

 

Clearly there is a need to eliminate any gender pay gap as shown in this report, and the Constabulary will strive to continue to achieve this.

 

The key steps which are in place include :

·       Ensuring open and transparent recruitment procedures are in place to encourage females to apply to join  the force

·       Transparent procedures for identifying and delivering learning and development  needs across the force as part of maximising both its capacity and capability

·       Ensuring open and fair promotion processes across the force

·       Having strong role models across the Force

·       The application of family friendly policies

·       The application of flexible working practices  

 

The above will require the ongoing review of procedures, the provision of unconscious bias training as well as feedback from both male and female officers and staff in relation to the openness and fairness for core procedures. Realistically, however, it will take time to eliminate the gender pay gay within force. However, the force remains committed to this aim.

 

 

 

Assistant Chief Officer

March 2018